Gold Mining Claims For Sale

GOLD MINING CLAIMS FOR SALE – WHITE GOLD AND YELLOW GOLD RINGS.

Gold Mining Claims For Sale

gold mining claims for sale

    mining claims

  • (Mining Claim) That portion of the public mineral lands that a miner, for mining purposes, takes hold of and possesses in accordance with mining laws.
  • (Mining claim) Ownership of mineral rights (more properly “mineral interest”) is an estate in real property. Technically it is known as a Mineral Estate and often referred to as mineral rights.

    for sale

  • For Sale is a tour EP by Say Anything. It contains 3 songs from …Is a Real Boy and 2 additional b-sides that were left off the album.
  • For Sale is the fifth album by German pop band Fool’s Garden, released in 2000.
  • purchasable: available for purchase; “purchasable goods”; “many houses in the area are for sale”

    gold

  • coins made of gold
  • A deep lustrous yellow or yellow-brown color
  • made from or covered with gold; “gold coins”; “the gold dome of the Capitol”; “the golden calf”; “gilded icons”
  • A yellow precious metal, the chemical element of atomic number 79, valued esp. for use in jewelry and decoration, and to guarantee the value of currencies
  • An alloy of this
  • amber: a deep yellow color; “an amber light illuminated the room”; “he admired the gold of her hair”

gold mining claims for sale – Modern Prospecting:

Modern Prospecting: How to Find, Claim and Sell Mineral Deposits (Prospecting and Treasure Hunting)
Modern Prospecting: How to Find, Claim and Sell Mineral Deposits (Prospecting and Treasure Hunting)
In this book an experienced prospector shares information acquired through 20 years of classroom study, field work and trial and error. He outlines a systematic approach to mineral exploration including how to recognize the signposts of a favorable area, do the land status research, and follow through with valid claim staking, soil and rock sampling and assaying. Chapters include descriptions of the major types of deposits; interviews with geologists; how to obtain an assay; use geochemical and geophysical methods; and stake a proper claim. Whether looking for gold, platinum, diamonds or any other mineral, anyone equipped with these basic skills greatly increases their ability to discover new bonanzas. With a handy glossary and helpful contact information this is the foremost how-to-do-it-right guide to prospecting in the 21st century.

Red Desert, Wyoming

Red Desert, Wyoming
One of the maybe two or three pictures I took during my nine day vacation to Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Arizona, and Idaho.

The Red Desert of Wyoming is one of my favorite places I have ever seen.
Yet a lot of it will be used for oil and other rescources. Here’s a history of the Red Desert from Friends of the Red Desert

Chronology 1812-2007
1812 – Robert Stuart, a trapper employed by a West Coast trading post owned by John Jacob Astor, is the first known white man to cross South Pass and the western part of Red Desert.

1824 – Legendary mountain man Jedediah Smith crosses South Pass from the east along with several other trappers, "opening up" the Pass to future westward bound pioneers seeking a route over the Great Divide.

1825 – The first to travel the Cherokee Trail were a group of trappers of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. Jim Bridger was among those trappers and he selected the route.

1843 – A party of Cherokee and whites traveled the Cherokee Trail by wagon and gave the trail its name. They were headed to California to seek gold.

1847 – Jim Bridger meets Latter Day Saints leader Brigham Young and a company of Mormon pioneers near the mouth of the Little Sandy area near present day Farson, advising the company of the route southward through the desert.

1857-58 – Lander Survey visited the Jack Morrow Hills.

1847-1869 – The Overland Trail was a paid stagecoach route, which meant stations were placed every 15 miles and a superintendent ready to supply coaches was placed every 250 miles. In 1865 it cost $150 per person to ride the trail one-way.

1862 – The Overland Trail moved south, following the route known as the Cherokee Trail.

1867 – South Pass Gold Rush -hundreds of mining claims staked in the Red Desert.

1868 – Wamsutter was settled as a stagecoach station for the railroad. It is now a center for oil and gas development.

1877 – Hayden Expedition passed through area, noting Steamboat Mountain’s aspen grove and clear, flowing springs.

Early 1890s – Last wild bison killed by cowboys in the Red Desert.

1897 – George Ferris and Ed Haggarty found enough Copper, Silver and Gold in the Ferris Mountains to stake a mining claim. Eleven years later the Ferris-Haggarty Company collapsed when it was indicted for fraudulent stock sales.

1898 – Dr. Frank Dunham proposed in Recreation Magazine that the Red Desert be designated a winter game preserve.

1900 – Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid robbed the Union Pacific No. 3 train near Tipton, Wyoming of $50,000. They used the Haystack Mountains, now part of the Citizen’s Proposed Wilderness Study Area of Adobe Town, to store fresh horses so they could escape their pursuers.

1918 – Report of the Secretary of the Interior stated that the Red Desert/Great Divide Basin was so badly overgrazed that it would be lost if measures were not taken to spare it. (Tom Bell, personal article, 1988)

1935 – A mummy was found in the Pedro Mountains. At first it was thought to be evidence of the validity of Shoshone and Crow legends of the "little people." However, it was later found to be an infant with anencephaly, a congenital abnormality that warped the proportions of the mummy’s skull.

1935 – Wyoming Governor Leslie Miller unsuccessfully attempts to designate a portion of the Red Desert as part of a larger "Western Trails" national park.

1950s – Uranium boom sweeps across Wyoming, thousands of claims staked in the Red Desert.

1950 – Congress expands Grand Teton National Park by combining it with Jackson Hole National Monument. Same legislation forbids creation or extension of national parks or monuments in Wyoming without express authorization of the Congress.

1961 – The Park Service requests Congress to designate most of the Red Desert (western part of the Great Divide Basin) a National Monument. The plan centered on the Boar’s Tusk, Steamboat Mountain and the Sand Dunes.

1968 – Tom Bell unsuccessfully attempts to get the Red Desert declared as a North American Antelope Range.

1960s – Unsuccessful attempt to declare the Red Desert as a Wild Horse Refuge (exact date unclear).

1992 – BLM issues draft Green River Resource Area RMP/EIS. Public comment strongly favors special protection for Red Desert.

1994 – Wyoming Wilderness Association, a coalition of Wyoming conservation organizations, including WOC, presents to BLM a "Citizen’s Wilderness Proposal for Wyoming BLM Lands." The proposal recommended that seven WSAs within the Red Desert be enlarged and designated wilderness.

1997 – BLM issues Record of Decision and Green River Resource Management Plan which defers decisions on fluid mineral and locatable mineral decisions for 88,000-acre core area surrounding Steamboat Mountain pending preparation of Jack Morrow Hills Coordinated Activity Plan (JMHCAP).

February, 1998 – BLM issues Notice of Intent to Prepare a Coordinated Activity Plan for the Jack Morrow Hills Area.

June, 1998 – BLM offers oil and gas leases in Jac

Red Desert, Wyoming (August 2006)

Red Desert, Wyoming (August 2006)
One of the maybe two or three pictures I took during my nine day vacation to Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Arizona, and Idaho in 2006.

The Red Desert of Wyoming is one of my favorite places I have ever seen.
Yet a lot of it will be used for oil and other rescources. Here’s a history of the Red Desert from Friends of the Red Desert

Chronology 1812-2007
1812 – Robert Stuart, a trapper employed by a West Coast trading post owned by John Jacob Astor, is the first known white man to cross South Pass and the western part of Red Desert.

1824 – Legendary mountain man Jedediah Smith crosses South Pass from the east along with several other trappers, "opening up" the Pass to future westward bound pioneers seeking a route over the Great Divide.

1825 – The first to travel the Cherokee Trail were a group of trappers of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. Jim Bridger was among those trappers and he selected the route.

1843 – A party of Cherokee and whites traveled the Cherokee Trail by wagon and gave the trail its name. They were headed to California to seek gold.

1847 – Jim Bridger meets Latter Day Saints leader Brigham Young and a company of Mormon pioneers near the mouth of the Little Sandy area near present day Farson, advising the company of the route southward through the desert.

1857-58 – Lander Survey visited the Jack Morrow Hills.

1847-1869 – The Overland Trail was a paid stagecoach route, which meant stations were placed every 15 miles and a superintendent ready to supply coaches was placed every 250 miles. In 1865 it cost $150 per person to ride the trail one-way.

1862 – The Overland Trail moved south, following the route known as the Cherokee Trail.

1867 – South Pass Gold Rush -hundreds of mining claims staked in the Red Desert.

1868 – Wamsutter was settled as a stagecoach station for the railroad. It is now a center for oil and gas development.

1877 – Hayden Expedition passed through area, noting Steamboat Mountain’s aspen grove and clear, flowing springs.

Early 1890s – Last wild bison killed by cowboys in the Red Desert.

1897 – George Ferris and Ed Haggarty found enough Copper, Silver and Gold in the Ferris Mountains to stake a mining claim. Eleven years later the Ferris-Haggarty Company collapsed when it was indicted for fraudulent stock sales.

1898 – Dr. Frank Dunham proposed in Recreation Magazine that the Red Desert be designated a winter game preserve.

1900 – Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid robbed the Union Pacific No. 3 train near Tipton, Wyoming of $50,000. They used the Haystack Mountains, now part of the Citizen’s Proposed Wilderness Study Area of Adobe Town, to store fresh horses so they could escape their pursuers.

1918 – Report of the Secretary of the Interior stated that the Red Desert/Great Divide Basin was so badly overgrazed that it would be lost if measures were not taken to spare it. (Tom Bell, personal article, 1988)

1935 – A mummy was found in the Pedro Mountains. At first it was thought to be evidence of the validity of Shoshone and Crow legends of the "little people." However, it was later found to be an infant with anencephaly, a congenital abnormality that warped the proportions of the mummy’s skull.

1935 – Wyoming Governor Leslie Miller unsuccessfully attempts to designate a portion of the Red Desert as part of a larger "Western Trails" national park.

1950s – Uranium boom sweeps across Wyoming, thousands of claims staked in the Red Desert.

1950 – Congress expands Grand Teton National Park by combining it with Jackson Hole National Monument. Same legislation forbids creation or extension of national parks or monuments in Wyoming without express authorization of the Congress.

1961 – The Park Service requests Congress to designate most of the Red Desert (western part of the Great Divide Basin) a National Monument. The plan centered on the Boar’s Tusk, Steamboat Mountain and the Sand Dunes.

1968 – Tom Bell unsuccessfully attempts to get the Red Desert declared as a North American Antelope Range.

1960s – Unsuccessful attempt to declare the Red Desert as a Wild Horse Refuge (exact date unclear).

1992 – BLM issues draft Green River Resource Area RMP/EIS. Public comment strongly favors special protection for Red Desert.

1994 – Wyoming Wilderness Association, a coalition of Wyoming conservation organizations, including WOC, presents to BLM a "Citizen’s Wilderness Proposal for Wyoming BLM Lands." The proposal recommended that seven WSAs within the Red Desert be enlarged and designated wilderness.

1997 – BLM issues Record of Decision and Green River Resource Management Plan which defers decisions on fluid mineral and locatable mineral decisions for 88,000-acre core area surrounding Steamboat Mountain pending preparation of Jack Morrow Hills Coordinated Activity Plan (JMHCAP).

February, 1998 – BLM issues Notice of Intent to Prepare a Coordinated Activity Plan for the Jack Morrow Hills Area.

June, 1998 – BLM offers oil and gas lease

gold mining claims for sale

gold mining claims for sale

Photo Reprint Hydraulic Mining - the Kennebec Claim, Birchville, Nevada County 1866
In 1859 photographic publishers Lawrence & Houseworth began selling stereographs from their San Francisco optical shop. They worked with local photographers to acquire a diverse collection of images documenting California’s major settlements, boom towns, placer and hydraulic mining operations, shipping and transportation routes, and such points of scenic interest throughout northern California and western Nevada as the Yosemite Valley and Calaveras Redwoods. Their views also included an extensive pictorial survey of mid-nineteenth-century San Francisco. Photo Reprint Hydraulic Mining – the Kennebec Claim, Birchville, Nevada County 1866. Reprint is 18 in. x 17 in. on archival quality photo paper.